Changes to Lockdown Measures (Step Two)

As the four tests of easing lockdown continue to be met, the government is continuing to take steps to ease lockdown rules.

Therefore, from 12 April:

  • No indoor mixing of different households will be allowed.
  • Non-essential shops, hairdressers, gyms, nail salons, libraries, and outdoor attractions such as theme parks and zoos will be allowed to reopen.
  • Outdoor hospitality can reopen, including pubs and restaurants – with the rule of six or a larger group from two households.
  • Customers will not have to buy a substantial meal to have an alcoholic drink and there will be no curfew but people will have to be seated when ordering and eating or drinking.
  • Two specified people can visit care home residents.
  • Children can attend indoor children’s activities, including sport.
  • Parent and child groups of up to 15 people (not counting children aged under five) can restart indoors.
  • Self-catering holidays in the UK with your own household will be allowed.

Before proceeding to the next step, the government will examine the data to assess the impact of previous changes.

The four conditions that must be met at each phase of lockdown easing are:

  1. The coronavirus vaccine programme continues to go to plan
  2. Evidence shows vaccines are sufficiently reducing the number of people dying with the virus or needing hospital treatment
  3. Infection rates do not risk a surge in hospital admissions
  4. New variants of the virus do not fundamentally change the risk of lifting restrictions

 

Changes to Lockdown Measures from 29 March 2021

As the four tests of easing lockdown continue to be met, the government is continuing to take steps to ease lockdown rules.

Therefore, from 29 March:

  • Up to six people from different households or a larger group from two households can meet outside, including in private gardens.
  • Outdoor sports facilities such as tennis or basketball courts will reopen and organised adult and children’s sport, such as grassroots football, will also return.
  • From this point, the government will drop the “Stay at Home” message and will instead encourage people to stay local wherever they can.
  • People will still have to work from home where possible and no overseas travel, apart from necessary work, will be allowed.

Before proceeding to the next step, the government will examine the data to assess the impact of previous changes.

The four conditions that must be met at each phase of lockdown easing are:

  1. The coronavirus vaccine programme continues to go to plan
  2. Evidence shows vaccines are sufficiently reducing the number of people dying with the virus or needing hospital treatment
  3. Infection rates do not risk a surge in hospital admissions
  4. New variants of the virus do not fundamentally change the risk of lifting restrictions

 

Changes to Lockdown Measures (Step One)

As Covid-19 infection rates are beginning to slow, the government is now taking steps to ease lockdown rules.

The first stage of easing will be split into two parts:

From 8 March:

  • All schools and colleges in England will reopen, while all childcare can resume. Secondary school pupils will have to wear facemasks initially while staff in all schools are advised to wear masks. All secondary and college pupils will be tested twice a week, at school for the first two weeks then at home.
  • All households with school children, members of their support and childcare bubbles, and those in related occupations will be encouraged to be tested regularly.
  • One person will be able to meet one other person from another household outside for recreation, not just exercise. This includes meeting in private gardens and will mean two people can meet for a picnic or sit on a bench with a coffee but they cannot play tennis or golf.
  • Care home residents in England will be allowed one regular visitor. They will be able to meet indoors and hold hands – but visitors must wear PPE and be tested beforehand.

From 29 March:

  • Up to six people from different households or a larger group from two households can meet outside, including in private gardens.
  • Outdoor sports facilities such as tennis or basketball courts will reopen and organised adult and children’s sport, such as grassroots football, will also return.
  • From this point, the government will drop the “Stay at Home” message and will instead encourage people to stay local wherever they can.
  • People will still have to work from home where possible and no overseas travel, apart from necessary work, will be allowed.

There will be four steps for easing restrictions. But before proceeding to each next step, the government will examine the data to assess the impact of previous changes.

The four conditions that must be met at each phase of lockdown easing are:

  1. The coronavirus vaccine programme continues to go to plan
  2. Evidence shows vaccines are sufficiently reducing the number of people dying with the virus or needing hospital treatment
  3. Infection rates do not risk a surge in hospital admissions
  4. New variants of the virus do not fundamentally change the risk of lifting restrictions

Downing Street said the four tests are currently being met so the first step of lockdown easing in England will proceed as planned on 8 March.

Become a Volunteer Vaccinator!

If you are in a priority group and have not been offered a Covid-19 vaccination appointment yet, please do not worry – the NHS will offer you one soon.

The NHS will continue to contact people directly to invite them to receive the vaccine when it is their turn. This may be via the phone, text message or letter from a Croydon GP practice.

Please note that these letters will not give you a specific appointment time, they will provide a number for you to ring in order to book your slot, so there is no danger of you missing out on a vaccination appointment if your post has been delayed.

The NHS is working flat out to offer the vaccine as quickly and safely as they can. But the they need our help and support to get everyone vaccinated as quickly as possible.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have asked St John Ambulance to support its mass vaccination programme.

During the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, St John’s highly skilled volunteers have already given hundreds of thousands of hours of their time, supporting the NHS in caring for patients on board ambulances, in hospitals and as part of vital community projects, such as this year’s seasonal flu vaccinations.

All of that work continues, and the charity has now been tasked with training thousands of volunteers ready to administer COVID-19 vaccinations as soon as they are available.

Between now and spring 2021, they have plans to train more than 30,000 volunteers. Using their longstanding expertise, they will empower people like you to deliver these vital jabs and take care of people before and after they receive them.

There are 3 roles specific to the vaccination programme:

  • Volunteer Vaccinator
  • Vaccination Care Volunteer
  • Volunteer Patient Advocate

Some people, specifically the Volunteer Vaccinators, will be able to give vaccinations, but others are there to support people as they go through the process of having the flu or COVID-19 vaccination.

To find out more about becoming a Volunteer Vaccinator, please click here.